In 2010, the children's book Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave was written by Laban Carrick Hill and illustrated by Bryan Collier. Drake’s poem vessels can also be found in other museums, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Smithsonian collection of the National Museum of American History; and the McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina, which in 1998 presented the first exhibition devoted solely to Drake’s pottery. A vessel by enslaved artist David Drake, one of the 19th century's most important American ceramicists, has been acquired by the St. Louis Art Museum, the institution announced Wednesday. During the time Drake produced his largest amount of wares that included poetry. Dave produced over 100,000 alkaline-glazed stoneware jugs between the 1820s and the 1870s. Some scholars believe that Drake created more than 40,000 pots in his lifetime. The poetry on this vessel reads: the Civil Liberties Act of 1988) should parallel the reparations that are being argued for. Dave produced over 100,000 alkaline-glazed stoneware jugs between the 1820s and the 1870s. Read Appraisal Transcript . Leonard Todd [10] The poetry on this vessel reads:[10], Put every bit all between "[11] A total twenty of Drake's jars and jugs are inscribed with original poetry and fifty additional vessels reveal his signature, maker's mark, date, and other inscriptions. [19] Philadelphia Museum of Art,[20] Museum of Fine Arts, Boston,[21] and the McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina. Miles Pottery, Edgefield County, South Carolina, 1853, alkaline-glazed stoneware, 14 1/2 x 12 x 11 1/2", collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Sally and Paul Hawkins, 1999.18.1. After emancipation, he adopted the surname of Drake. In addition to the comprehensive collection of David Drake pottery, the GCMA also owns the original art created by illustrator Bryan Collier for the 2011 Caldecott Honor book, "Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave." Starting bid: US $12,000.00 [ 0 bids] Shipping: FREE Economy Shipping | See details . Harvey Drake owned a large pottery business with his business partner Abner Landrum. Funded through a bond issue approved by Greenville County Council in 2019, these critical updates will ensure the protection of our community's valuable art collection and enhance our visitor experience. Landrum's son, Franklin Landrum. [8] Miles' factory was known as 'Stony Bluff.' [3] It is unclear how Drake learned to read and write. It won the Coretta Scott King Award and was a Caldecott Honor book in 2011. Item location: Lexington, South Carolina, United States . [10] Drake's jars are bulbous in form, similar to most ware produced in antebellum Edgefield. David Drake was an enslaved African American in Edgefield, South Carolina during the first three quarters of the nineteenth century. Harvey was in business with his uncle, Dr. Abner Landrum, who had opened a pottery factory just a mile outside the town of Edgefield. J. Garrison Stradling originally appraised this jug at the 1999 Charleston ROADSHOW event in Charleston, S.C., … This stood for Lewis Miles, the man who owned the pottery workshop where Drake worked (Miles may have enslaved Dave for a time, starting in the late 1830s). One hundred twenty-nine vessels either clearly marked or attributed to Dave were catalogued, Seller: jettlagg760 | Seller's other items. Most southern states in the early 1800s restricted black literacy, and in 1830s legislation was passed laws prohibiting their education. Watch . Photo by John Parnell. Among the pots in the collection of the Greenville County Museum of Art is a storage jar dated 1829, which is one of the earliest examples of Dave’s Pottersville work. His first known owner was Harvey Drake, a young man of Edgefield District, South Carolina. In a Slave's Pottery, a Saga of Courage and Beauty - New York Times article about Dave. He was an artist, poet, and potter, and created extraordinary work in spite of the adversity he faced as a slave. 1854 Dave Drake stoneware jug. [15] Lewis Miles has even been referenced directly in one of Drake's couplets: "Dave belongs to Mr. David Drake [1800-1874] was an influential African-American ceramic artist, born into slavery under the pottery-making families of Edgefield, South Carolina. When the Civil War began, many Edgefield slaves were conscripted as workers by the new Confederate government, but Dave, who was sixty at the time, continued making pottery. In 2013 author Andrea Cheng published the middle grade novel Etched in Clay: The Life of Dave, Enslaved Potter and Poet offering a biographical look at Drake's life. [1], Drake produced alkaline-glazed stoneware jugs between the 1820s and the 1870s. Also known as Dave the Potter, Dave Pottery, Dave the Slave, or Dave of the Hive, he is known to have had several different owners during his lifetime, including Harvey Drake, Reuben Drake, Jasper Gibbs, and Lewis Miles. Experience the powerful story of David Drake, one of the 19th century’s most remarkable artists. David Drake (known widely as “Dave the Potter”) was born enslaved circa 1801 on a plantation in South Carolina. Edgefield Pottery David Drake " Dave " attributed Southern Stoneware Slave made: Condition:--not specified. David Drake, also known as "Dave Pottery", Dave the Potter and Dave the Slave, was an American potter who lived in Edgefield, South Carolina. David Drake (also "Dave the Potter" and "Dave the Slave") (c. 1801-c. 1870s) was an American potter who lived in Edgefield, South Carolina and produced over 100 alkaline-glazed stoneware jugs from the 1820s to the 1860s. 1-3 by David Drake Hard Cover 1st Ed. [12] One marker of Drake's work is that his jars are widest at the top - "They are wide-mouthed forms with thick, rolled rims and high broad shoulders. He teamed with a slave named Henry, whose arms were crippled, but whose strong legs could drive the wheel for Dave. [8] South Carolina's Negro Act of 1740, prohibited teaching enslaved Africans to read and write, punishable by a fine of 100 pounds and six months in prison. the work of Dave the Potter, or David Drake (ca. David Drake (1800-1874) was an influential African-American ceramic artist, born into slavery under the pottery-making families of Edgefield, South Carolina. [8] During the period of his enslavement by Franklin Lundrum, Drake's wares were not inscribed and no poetry is thought to have been produced. [12], One of Drake's most well known pieces, a 19-inch greenware pot, is dated back to August 16, 1857 includes the following description:[9][13], I wonder where is all my relations Dec 11, 2020 - Explore Stephanie Buckley's board "David Drake" on Pinterest. The effort to understand the unusual relationships among Dave, his owners, and the community of Edgefield continues today. An enslaved African American, he often signed his works "Dave." [3], In 1849, Lewis Miles bought and enslaved Drake. Joja lozzo 16:15, 3 March 2011 (UTC) I agree, and will make the changes. Ceramics Monthly featured Drake's work in the September 1978 issue. Museum staff continue to work on site, developing educational programs and publications and planning exhibitions and events. Miles / Wher the oven bakes & the pot biles.". Like all his pots, it is coated with a solution of wood ash, sand, and clay, which becomes a hard, glistening alkaline glaze upon firing. The African-American potter, David Drake (circa 1801 to circa 1875), was enslaved for … Greenville Web Design by Your Creative People. Ended: May 30, 2020. Northern troops marched into Edgefield in June of 1864, allowing Dave to claim his freedom. Apparently with his owner’s approval, Drake openly expressed his literacy and his literary skills by inscribing original poems on many of the utilitarian works he created. This pottery business and the area, within which David Drake worked is known as Pottersville. [10] Some of these were explanatory "Put every bit all between / surely this jar will hold 14;" and some, like the one above, were commentaries on the institution of slavery. "David Drake was the only literate enslaved African American potter with a known body of work in this country. [3] During this time period it was PUNISHABLE for enslaved people to be literate, especially in South Carolina. 1800-1874), a nineteenth-century African American slave and potter who worked in Edgefield, South Carolina. The example of Dave the Slave is a case in point. Drake's poetry at this time increased from one every few years to three in 1857, eight in 1858, and seven in 1859. David Drake - SC African American History Calendar Profile - Duration: 3:02. David Drake: Potter and Poet September 24, 2016 – December 18, 2016 Vero Beach Museum of Art is organizing the first major museum exhibition of pottery by the enslaved African potter best known as “Dave,” since the influential survey exhibition mounted by McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina in 1998. The well known inscription, "I wonder where is all my relations / Friendship to all—and every nation," demonstrates Drake questioning his heritage and personal history. [1][14] It is believed that the inscriptions Drake included on his works were used as a method of personal expression, communication with other slaves, and even defiance to the institution of slavery. This documentation would allow for easy identification of Drake's pottery today; however, the lack of concrete legislation ordering reparations being made to Drake's descendants bars the possibility of any restitution. $15.88. Experience the powerful story of David Drake, an enslaved African-American who worked as a “turner” in several pottery manufacturing facilities in South Carolina’s Edgefield District. Jun 22, 2015 - JUG/ Dave Drake (c. 1800-c. 1870), Lewis J. Known simply as Dave, he worked as a turner in the potteries for which Edgefield was noted throughout the South. Dave, an enslaved African American, worked at the Lewis J. In 2008 Leonard Todd published a cohesive biography on Drake. Scholars believe Drake produced a remarkable 40,000 pots in his lifetime. Drake, who was known only as “Dave” before 1865, learned to both read and write, dangerous and even illegal skills for a slave to possess. The Legions of Fire The Books of the Elements David Drake HCDJ 1st Ed 1st Print . He’s known today for the magnificent quality of the pots he made, the size of the pots, and he wrote poems on some of his pots—during an era when it was a crime for slaves to know how to read and write. Drake lived and worked in Edgefield for almost the entirety of his life. [3] During the antebellum period, Drake was one of the 76 known enslaved African American to have worked in Edgefield's twelve pottery factories. Another unclear detail about Drake's life is his missing leg. Leonard Todd's interest lies in the fact that two of his ancestors enslaved Drake at some point in time. The GCMA is home to the largest institutional collection of pottery vessels by David Drake, including single-handle jugs, storage jars, pitchers, a syrup jug, and a rare butter churn. Jill Beute Koverman This study examines the extant work of a prolific potter, an African American named David Drake, who as a slave often signed his work "Dave" and incised verses he had written into his clay vessels. This collaboration between two damaged men, created some of the finest ware in the Edgefield pottery industry. In 1846, Rev. Miles Pottery in South Carolina. Lot of 8 David Drake Science Fiction Sci-Fi Fantasy Paperback Books. Mary Mark Ockerbloom 00:11, 14 March 2015 (UTC) External links modified. Dr. Landrum created a village, which he called Pottersville, around the enterprise. Drake's treatment under Franklin Landrum was poor. He is recognized as the first enslaved potter to inscribe his work, during a time when most enslaved people were illiterate, often forbidden from literacy, and anonymous. John Landrum. He was educated by his first enslaver, stoneware maker and newspaper editor Abner Landrum, and may have worked at Landrum’s newspaper, the Edgefield Hive, as a typesetter. [3] The first legal record of Drake is a description from June 13, 1818, that describes "a boy about 17 years old country born" who was "mortgaged to Eldrid Simkins by Harvey Drake". Scholars speculate he was taught by Landrum, who was known to be a religious man and may have taught Drake how to read the Bible. David Drake (1800–1874) was an influential African American ceramic artist, enslaved from birth under the pottery -making families of Edgefield, South Carolina. This contemplation signifies Drake's positivity despite facing the many brutalities slavery, including the loss of personal identity. Drake's earliest recorded work is a pot dated July 12, 1834. Dave the Potter, byname of David Drake, also called Dave the Slave, (born c. 1800, probably United States—died 1870s, Edgefield, South Carolina ? 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